President Barack Obama (l) waves with Presidential nominee Hillary Clinton during the third night of the Democratic National Convention at the Wells Fargo Center in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, July 27. (Nicholas Kamm | AFP | Getty Images)


A moment for the history books, as Hillary Clinton becomes the Democratic Party’s nominee for U.S. Presidential polls, come November. The growing clout of Indian Americans in U.S. politics also gained spotlight as three leaders from the community took the center stage at the recently concluded Democratic National Convention that anointed Hillary Clinton as party’s presidential nominee, writes Lalit K. Jha. – @Siliconeer #Siliconeer #HillaryClinton #DonaldTrump #Trump #Hillary #AmericaVotes #USPresidentialElections2016 #NeeraTanden #DemocraticNationalConvention #DNC #AmiBera #CongressmanAmiBera #RajaKrishnamoorthi #MajorKamaljeetSinghKalsi # SruthiPalaniappan #HumaAbedin #ShefaliRazdanDuggal #AditiHardikar #IndianAmerican


A proponent of clean energy, Clinton is known for being a strong advocate of Indo-U.S. ties. As a New York Senator, she was instrumental in the launch of the Senate India Caucus – the only country-specific Senate Caucus, and was its founding co-chairman. Clinton also has several Indian Americans in key positions in her campaign including Huma Abedin, Neera Tanden, Shefali Razdan Duggal and Aditi Hardikar.

President Barack Obama and Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton acknowledge the crowd on the third day of the Democratic National Convention at the Wells Fargo Center, July 27, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. (Drew Angerer | Getty Images)

President Barack Obama and Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton acknowledge the crowd on the third day of the Democratic National Convention at the Wells Fargo Center, July 27, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. (Drew Angerer | Getty Images)

Indian American leader Neera Tanden made her political debut on national stage when she stood behind the lectern to address thousands of delegates of the Democratic Party and its top leadership in Philadelphia, July 27.

Tanden is currently president of the Center for American Progress, a progressive public policy research and advocacy organization based in Washington DC.

Tanden, 45, in her political debut, made a strong case for Clinton as the next president of the U.S.

Vice President nominee Tim Kaine acknowledges the crowd prior to delivering remarks on the third day of the Democratic National Convention at the Wells Fargo Center, July 27, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. (Joe Raedle | Getty Images)

Vice President nominee Tim Kaine acknowledges the crowd prior to delivering remarks on the third day of the Democratic National Convention at the Wells Fargo Center, July 27, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. (Joe Raedle | Getty Images)

“She is there for people. She has your back. For Hillary, politics is about fighting for people, not when the cameras are on, but when they are off. Not when the decisions are easy, but when they are hard,” she said.

“She is a leader we can have faith in. She will be a president we can count on to always. Let’s do this in November,” Tanden said.

Hillary Clinton delivers remarks during the fourth day of the Democratic National Convention at the Wells Fargo Center, July 28, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.  (Chip Somodevilla | Getty Images)

Hillary Clinton delivers remarks during the fourth day of the Democratic National Convention at the Wells Fargo Center, July 28, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. (Chip Somodevilla | Getty Images)

“It’s truly an honor for me to address this convention. Because frankly, I would not be here without the policies of the democratic party,” said Tanden, a close confidant of Clinton.

Tanden is speculated as a potential cabinet appointee in Clinton’s administration.

Congressman Ami Bera in his brief appearance said, “As the only South Asian member of Congress, as a member of the Foreign Affairs Committee, I support Hillary Clinton because she is the only candidate that understands the complexity of the world and is prepared from day one to lead America.”

Neera Tanden, president of the Center for American Progress Action Fund, speaks during the third day of the Democratic National Convention at the Wells Fargo Center, July 27, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. (Saul Loeb | AFP | Getty Images)

Neera Tanden, president of the Center for American Progress Action Fund, speaks during the third day of the Democratic National Convention at the Wells Fargo Center, July 27, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. (Saul Loeb | AFP | Getty Images)

Raja Krishnamoorthi, a Democratic Congressional candidate from Illinois, has been introduced as one of the party’s emerging leaders during the Convention.

Krishnamoorthi, 42, is among only two Congressional candidates to have been invited on to the DNC stage here as the party’s rising star or emerging leader.

A decorated Sikh American army veteran stood out in his pink turban at the Democratic convention as he joined top retired generals on stage here in support of Hillary Clinton, July 28.

Maj (retd) Kamaljeet Singh Kalsi joined Gen (retd) John Allen and other top retired American generals and veterans on stage at the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia, in support of the party’s presidential nominee.

Singh, one of the few Sikhs who have the distinction of serving in the U.S. armed forces, was distinct in the line of army generals and veterans in his pink turban. He had earned a Bronze Star Medal for his service in Afghanistan.

Former President Bill Clinton claps as he listens to President Barack Obama speak on the third day of the Democratic National Convention at the Wells Fargo Center, July 27, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. (Win McNamee | Getty Images)

Former President Bill Clinton claps as he listens to President Barack Obama speak on the third day of the Democratic National Convention at the Wells Fargo Center, July 27, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. (Win McNamee | Getty Images)

In 2009, Kalsi became the first Sikh in the U.S. military to receive permission to wear a beard and turban, thus ending a 23-year old policy that excluded Sikhs from service. The U.S. Armed forces now gives exceptions to Sikhs on a case-by-case basis to join active duty.

Sruthi Palaniappan, 18, from Cedar Rapids and a student of Harvard University is a strong supporter of Clinton. She became the youngest delegate at the Democratic National Convention this year.

“It is truly an incredible experience. I have been able to witness the democratic process and this is truly an instrumental part of what I am going to do in the future,” Sruthi told PTI, July 28, the last day of the four-day Democratic National Convention.

Having met Clinton as many as four times during the primary season, Sruthi said she is inspired by her leadership and vision and she would herself like to join electoral politics one day.

“I became involved in politics in service and advocacy related activities and when the time came to be involved in the election process, I jumped right on board,” she said.

“I got into the Clinton campaign, and went door to door canvasing in my area. I was able to encourage people to come out and vote. For the primary voting I was entrusted to count the votes on the Hillary side,” Sruthi explained as to how she became a delegate.

In addition to being the youngest delegate, Sruthi made history when she was given an opportunity to represent Iowa State during roll call votes. She said Iowa is a state of female surge.

“Together, we have made history by electing the first woman presidential nominee of a major political party – Hillary Rodham Clinton,” Sruthi said in a Facebook post.

“But I’m extremely glad that I have been able to immerse myself at every step along the way and witness the political process first-hand,” she said, hoping to make Iowa proud and show the country that young people can truly make a profound impact if they step up to the plate and get engaged.

Highly impressed by the electrifying speech given by President Barack Obama, Sruthi said “the American Dream is something no wall will ever contain.”

Obama’s legacy and efforts will live on when Clinton and her vice presidential running mate Tim Kaine become elected the new President and Vice President of the US, she said.

“If we let Donald Trump take over the presidency, really terrible things will take our country several steps back,” she said.

Declaring that the U.S. is at a “moment of reckoning”, Hillary Clinton attacked her Republican rival Donald Trump, July 28, for his “bigotry and bombast” while pitching herself to be a steady leader, as she scripted history by becoming the first woman presidential nominee.

Presenting her vision of inclusive growth for America that maintains its global leadership and military power, the Democratic presidential nominee warned voters that a man who could be baited with a tweet cannot be trusted with nuclear weapons.